Everything DiSC tagged posts

New Podcast Episode on Emotional Intelligence & Leadership and Team Agility: HOW AGILE ARE YOU?

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It’s clear that the CoVid 19 challenge the world is still facing has required new levels of leadership and teaming skills. People and organizations have been called to step up their game in order to lead through this crisis and beyond.

Listen to Dean interview Laura on the importance of emotional intelligence, agility, and intuition to lead through change and disruption. As they discuss, we all have a natural inclination for how we handle new situations and the conflicts that may arise. How easily do you adapt to new situations, not just at work, but in your community and society? Your level of agility impacts your relationships with coworkers and colleagues, friends and family members, and the world at large.

We have two resources to help you and your coworkers and teams to become...

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Our New Capabilities to Help You Navigate the New World of Work

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It goes without saying that the world has changed dramatically for all of us in these last 5 to 6 months.  Many of the well-laid plans we had in place for 2020 were disrupted if not downright demolished.

We have all had to become more resilient, more agile and flexible, and certainly more digital than ever before.  Now that we have been into this crisis for more than a few months, it is apparent that this situation will be a marathon and not a sprint.

In the short-term, many organizations had to put aside their plans to grow and develop their people to deal with the urgent needs of the moment due to the global pandemic. However, not preparing your people to deal effectively with the new world of work is not sustainable. This email outlines just a few of the new, enhanced capabilities we...

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What Your Personality Tells You About Working Remotely

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Whether we’re fans of it or not, working from home has become a reality that’s here to stay—with or without a crisis. While some personalities lend themselves well to working from home, others have a more difficult time adjusting to remote conditions. Regardless of all the questions surrounding the work from home trend, such as, “Will this become the new norm,” one fact remains clear—remote work requires increased communication, connection, clarity, and understanding.

Working from home also means flexing outside of our comfort zones. It might, at times, require more empathy towards our colleagues, different ways of interacting, more frequent check-ins, and finding new ways to meet our daily needs.

For some personality types, working from home is probably like winning the jackp...

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Making Stress Work for You

Every day, we are inundated with ideas on how to reframe our perspectives around different issues. A new diet to help reframe our relationship with food, a digital course on how to change the way we manage finances, a self-help book on how to better understand where your spouse is coming from during an argument. All of these are great solutions for certain people in certain situations. But what about an actionable way to reframe something that affects all of us?

We’re talking about stress.

No matter how much or little, we all experience stress on a daily basis. For some of us, it can be debilitating. For others, only a mild annoyance. Whichever camp you fall into, stress is an unavoidable part of our lives. We all experience it in different ways, shapes, and forms...

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Leading with Emotional Intelligence: Gain the Agile EQ Edge!

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Let’s face it, most leaders are struggling with the volatile, uncertain, chaotic, and ambiguous world of work today. As a result of this turbulence, every company, leader, and employee needs to be on the lookout for an edge that will allow them to manage the chaos and succeed despite it.

That edge for leaders and teams is emotional intelligence. “Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand, use, and manage your own emotions in positive ways to relieve stress, communicate effectively, empathize with others, overcome challenges and defuse conflict,” according to Dan Siegel, mindfulness and EQ expert. Daniel Goleman, author of many leading-edges resources on emotional intelligence has stated that “EQ is 7 or more times more important than IQ for leadership success.”

The Eve...

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The Invisible Drain on Your Company’s Culture

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Here’s a hard business truth: No workplace is free of the ravages of distrust. Anyone who’s ever held a job knows the frustrations that emerge when coworkers don’t trust each other – the miscommunications, rivalries, inefficiencies, morale problems, and turnover that, in the end, distract people from their work and make life stressful. And ultimately, research shows, cost money.Dr. Mark Scullard, a PhD psychologist who serves as senior director of product innovation for Wiley’s Workplace Learning Solutions division, has studied distrust in the workplace and found its source: individual insecurity. It’s not insecurity itself that’s the problem, though; it’s our drive to cover it up...
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Don’t Be Upstaged by Workplace Drama

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“To be, or not to be? That is the question—” okay, so that isn’t the question we’re asking in this blog post. But we are discussing drama, although the type of drama we’re referring to happens in the workplace, not the theater. According to a recent Wiley study that asked 12,000 people, “What is the first word or phrase that comes to mind when you think of ‘interpersonal conflict in the workplace’?” one answer was exceedingly prominent. Any guesses? (Spoiler alert!) It’s “drama.”

But while poor Hamlet was waxing poetic over the all of the dreadful tragedy that Shakespeare thrust upon him, drama in the workplace is generally a reaction to one core issue: conflict. As we’ve mentioned, conflict is an uncomfortable but unavoidable part of any organization...

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Reframing Conflict: from Evade to Engage

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When it comes to dealing with the uncomfortable things in life—fears, threats, stressors—our “fight-or-flight response” is often triggered. We hear this phrase a lot, but it is indeed a real physiological phenomena; something deep in our nervous system that urges us to either prepare for battle (fight) or flee the sticky situation (flight).Conflict, especially in the workplace, is certainly one of those uncomfortable parts of life. Yet with workplace conflict, it seems that most people choose to simply avoid or delay. We’re talking about a “no-fight-only-flight response” here. To most of us, catching a cold or losing your keys sounds preferable to addressing conflict with a coworker...
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Your Users’ Guide to YOU

Up-Front Information is a Game-Changer 
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How many times have you experienced the anxiety of a change in the workplace? This could come from a promotion, a transfer, starting a new job, or even getting a new boss. It’s an uncomfortable, but generally unavoidable part of taking on new career opportunities. Part of that innate worry stems from a place of “I hope I’m good at this”, but a lot of it can come from a place of, “I hope these people get me.” The worry is valid—being misunderstood is a major concern for most people, in all facets of life. Ted Hockey, CEO of TD Ameritrade, set out to proactively ensure his new employees (over 7,000 of them) had a clear, accurate understanding of him before his first day.

In his Fast Company article, “I wrote a users’ guide to mys...

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How Inclusion Creates an Engaged Culture

People-Whispering Tip:

“No culture can live if it attempts to be exclusive.”  ~ Mohandas Gandhi

“I want to appreciate you without judging. Join you without invading. Invite you without demanding.  Leave you without guilt.”  ~ Virginia Satir

“To say ‘we’ and mean ‘I’ is one of the most recondite insults.” ~ Theodor Adorno


What We Can Learn About Inclusion From “The Planet of the Apes”

I suspect you may be wondering what apes have to do with corporate culture.

Well, during the filming of the movie “The Planet of the Apes” in 1967, Charlton Heston (remember Moses?) noticed that “an instinctive segregation” seemed to occur with actors on the set...

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