Monthly Archives October 2019

Building Culture on the Job Site: a Success Story

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The construction industry is one full of stress and challenges. From project delays to a lack of resources, construction industry workers face many obstacles to ensure our communities are built correctly and on schedule. When you add lots of different people of varying trades, backgrounds, and work styles to the mix, tensions can run high. Often times, these workers (like most of us) are not taught how to deal with workplace conflict, so issues go unresolved, or even escalated.

One organization is determined to change all of this by providing support, education, and ensuring safe work conditions for its members...
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Reframing Conflict: from Evade to Engage

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When it comes to dealing with the uncomfortable things in life—fears, threats, stressors—our “fight-or-flight response” is often triggered. We hear this phrase a lot, but it is indeed a real physiological phenomena; something deep in our nervous system that urges us to either prepare for battle (fight) or flee the sticky situation (flight).Conflict, especially in the workplace, is certainly one of those uncomfortable parts of life. Yet with workplace conflict, it seems that most people choose to simply avoid or delay. We’re talking about a “no-fight-only-flight response” here. To most of us, catching a cold or losing your keys sounds preferable to addressing conflict with a coworker...
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It’s Time to Stop Confusing Perks for Culture

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Dog-friendly workspaces. Flexible PTO. Shoe-optional dress code. Free beer on Fridays. The idea of company culture has become almost synonymous with this idea of a very modern workplace—think less law firm, more Google.But culture isn’t about standing desks and catered lunches (although, free food is never a bad idea). According to Melissa Daimler, “there are three elements to a culture: behaviors, systems, and practices, all guided by an overarching set of values.” In her HBR.com article, she explains that a great culture exists when all three elements are aligned with each other, as well as with the organization’s values. When “gaps start to appear,” problems soon follow. With enough problems and a little time, great employees start to leave.

What, then, makes a cul...

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